Sexuality and Consequences


Sexuality and Consequences is designed to assess respondents' relationships and sexual activity. This measure is an updated version of an earlier measure used by the Fast Track Project called Romantic Relationships Questionnaire and was first used in year 13. Questions were derived from National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health Wave III measures and Pittsburgh Youth Study Measure 07035 - Sexual Activity.

Abstract

Sexuality and Consequences is an updated version of an earlier measure used by the Fast Track Project called Romantic Relationships Questionnaire and was first used in year 13. The measure is designed to assess respondents' relationships and sexual activity and can be broken down into six sections: 1) heterosexual relationships and birth control use, 2) pregnancy, 3) children of respondents, 4) same sex relationships, 5) sexually transmitted diseases, and 6) rape. Respondents who are willing to answer questions about their sexual experiences are asked about their sexual history, use of birth control, whether they have ever been pregnant or made anyone pregnant, as well as a series of questions about their children, whether they have any sexual diseases and their knowledge about AIDS, and whether they have ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse.

Analysts looking at distributional characteristics of the respondents should note the response rate for each group for the gateway question of the measure, "Will you answer questions about your sexual experience?" Only 82% of the normative sample and 75% of the control sample said yes. In addition, the sample size is quite small for several items and variables so caution should be used when analyzing the data.

Also, analysts should note that several secondary datasets had to be created, using the original data, in order to examine the data for birth control use, reported pregnancies, and each child of the respondents in a more comprehensive manner. Additionally, analysts need to recognize that, since no respondent said that the child lived with someone other than a parent, the measure skipped the next question that asked, "Who is the child living with (identify the person who is primarily responsible for the child)?"

There is very high variance for the item "In the past year, how many times have you been / have you made a girl or woman pregnant?" for the females (one subject reported having been pregnant 12 times in the last year). Analysts should consider how to use, alter or exclude this subject from analyses.

Finally, for item "When were you first told you had a sexually transmitted disease?", the normative sample for females shows some unusual data with an extremely high standard deviation and very low mean age for this variable. Again, analysts should carefully consider how to handle this data given the wide variance and small sample size.

Dataset Names

Raw Dataset Name:CxBE
Scored Dataset Name: SECySCc

Keywords

Sexual Intercourse, Contraception, Birth Control, Pregnancy, Parenting, Marital Status, Living Arrangements, Sexual Orientation, Sexually Transmitted Disease, HIV/AIDS