Young Adult Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children


The NIMH Young Adult Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (YADISC-IV) assesses DSM-IV psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses in young adults up to age 24 and older adolescents who live without a parent or guardian. The DISC was designed to be given by lay interviewers for epidemiological research.

Abstract

The NIMH Young Adult Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (YADISC-IV) assesses DSM-IV psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses in young adults up to age 24 and older adolescents who live without a parent or guardian. The DISC was designed to be given by lay interviewers for epidemiological research. Fast Track administered the measures using a laptop computer (Computerized DISC, or YADISC).

The DISC items are organized by diagnosis. Youth are asked if they experienced specific symptoms related to a disorder during the past month or year. For substance abuse and dependence disorders, diagnoses are based only on behavior in past 12 months, past month behavior is not assessed separately. Follow-up questions are asked if a child reports a given symptom. The possible responses to most of the DISC questions are “No” (0), “Yes” (1), “Not Applicable” (8), or “Don’t Know” (9). During the scoring process, the “Don’t Know” responses are recoded as missing. The recoding depends on whether the DISC is administered to the child or parent.

The DISC group at Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute (overseen by David Shaffer, M.D., Prudence Fisher, Ph.D., and John Piacentini, Ph.D) constructed the scoring programs that correspond to the DSM-IV. Variable names were changed to match the Fast Track format. The three types of summary scores are Criterion and Symptom Counts, Diagnosis Indicators, and Impairment Indicators.

It is recommended that the analyst use categorical-type analyses when examining diagnosis and diagnosis plus impairment variables and count-type analyses for criterion count variables. Analysts should refer to the numerous previous studies that have used the CDISC for examples of methods used to analyze these data. Analysts should also examine how many participants met diagnostic criteria (or diagnosis plus impairment criteria) before generating descriptive statistics or using outcomes in statistical models. In general, most items will have a high frequency of participants who did not meet criteria (i.e., zeros), so examination of individual response distributions is highly advised.

Dataset Names

Raw Dataset Name: CyBR
Scored Dataset Name: YADySCc

Keywords

Anxiety, Mood, Conduct Disorder, Disruptive Behavior, Obsessive Compulsive, Oppositional Defiant, Panic, Separation Anxiety, Eating Disorder, Alcohol Abuse, Substance Abuse.